Margrethe Odgaard

Textile and colour designer Margrethe Odgaard apply herself to the sensual quality of colour in the surface. She works with colour as a full, sensory perception and believes that products made with the intention of nourishing the body and mind will have a positive impact on the viewer. With her intense focus on the interaction of colour, material and space, she aims to become clearer about how we as humans experience and emotionally connect with the world around us.

Odgaard shares her time equally between commercial collaborations and an artistic practice based on self-initiated research. Her clients include Kvadrat, Muuto, Montana, HAY, IKEA and Georg Jensen Damask, and her exhibition catalogue includes solo exhibitions at Röhsska Museum (SE), Designmuseo Helsinki (FI), and Munkeruphus (DK). In 2015 she received the Three-year work grant from The Danish Arts Foundation and in 2016 she was awarded the prestigious Torsten and Wanja Söderberg Award (SE).

In addition to running her own studio, Margrethe Odgaard is part of the design duo Included Middle together with furniture designer Chris L. Halstrøm. The two designers design furniture and objects from the two simple questions: what if colour is seen as something suggesting form, and what it form is seen as something suggesting colour.

Before setting up her design studio in 2013, Odgaard worked as a printing assistant at The Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia, USA, followed by seven years as textile designer in the French fashion company EPICE. She graduated from The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design in 2005 with additional studies at Rhode Island School of Design in USA.

Margrethe Odgaard Studio
Sturlasgade 14 T, 2.
Islands Brygge
2300 Copenhagen S
Denmark

Studio enquiries
hello@margretheodgaard.com

Intern enquiries
intern@margretheodgaard.com

Fold Unfold Fly, 2015

MO FUF 15

1/3

Most of the time, a tablecloth is kept folded in a closet, waiting for the occasion to dress the table, and as a consequence the folds become an inevitable part of the visual appearance when unfolded on the table. Instead of ignoring the folds as a practical necessity, Fold Unfold Fly makes a point out of them. With a printed pattern of colours bleeding in the folds, the shadows of the folds merge into the pattern to form a subtle and poetic surface, in which the folds have become part of the pattern.

The structure of the printed pattern is based on the grid of the habitual way of folding a tablecloth, transferred from generation to generation through centuries over big parts of the world: Two persons stand in each end of the tablecloth, they centerfold length-wise, tilt, then lift the corners to the centerfold, pull to make the folds fall neatly, move towards each other with the folded tablecloth between them, and again centerfold repeatedly. Most men and women regardless of social status know this almost ritual dance of folding a tablecloth, and often an older member of the family taught them. By putting a narrative to this behavioral pattern, Fold Unfold Fly seeks to give evidence to a cultural heritage of very little attention.

100% Halb Panama cotton canvas, digital textile print, 140×240 cm